OCD

Trauma causes a high anxiety behavioural response. OCD can be created as a process of several stressful experiences or it can be created by a single traumatic event.

The brain responds by creating a safety process based on behaviour that keeps it reassured of being in ‘control’. This behaviour doesn’t have to be logical, it can be anything that is considered soothing and reassuring. There are many ways for the obsessive behaviour to manifest, including counting stairs, endlessly washing hands, checking if the front door is locked 20 times a day, or compulsively cleaning every day.

There is no logic needed for this behaviour to continue and the anxiety is relentless and ever-present. Once a pattern begins, it can be incredibly hard to break without help.

OCD treatment can take longer than general anxiety treatment. This is because how an OCD sufferer functions in life is perceived to be dependent upon these repetitive ‘safety’ processes. Any change to these processes will be considered a threat and may be met with some internal resistance. However, with patience and support most anxieties can be reduced, if not totally eliminated.

I focus on relaxing the brain’s limbic system – the flight, fight area, which in return triggers intellectual and habitual change. The brain restructures with new, positive experiences and although it may take some time, relaxed states can be practised and improved on. OCD sufferers often feel that there is no cure, but I truly believe that hypnotherapy can provide the breakthrough an OCD sufferer needs.

“Every person’s map of the world is as unique as their thumbprint. There are no two people alike. No two people who understand the same sentence the same way… So in dealing with people, you try not to fit them to your concept of what they should be.”

M H Erickson

© Veronika Geeson 2018

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I am a member of the Association for Solution Focused Hypnotherapy (AfSFH), National Council for Hypnotherapy (NCH), the General Hypnotherapy Register (GHR) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC)